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Entries in conscious capitalism (1)

Sunday
Aug032014

Conscious Capitalism AND Social Enterprise Is Conscious Business

There are two movements in business today that are highly related yet very disconnected – conscious capitalism and social enterprise. These two movements are actually quite similar when viewed from a whole system perspective – more aware AND responsible business. Taken together, conscious capitalism and social enterprise create conscious businesses with the potential to solve big problems through business while generating a sustainable future.

The conscious capitalism movement appears to be primarily focused on relationships, stakeholders and leadership practices. This is transformative work and deserves all the praise and attention the movement has received. Yet, it is not enough. When an individual embarks on a journey of transformation and develops a higher awareness (consciousness), they almost always begin to see themselves as part of a greater whole and over time start to make decisions about their lifestyle, habits and consumption aligned with more sustainable practices – seeing themselves as part of the whole, they act for the collective good. 

I do not see the same development when I look at the conscious capitalism movement, particularly two companies hailed as the leaders of the movement – Whole Foods and The Container Store. When shopping these stores, neither feels different to me. Back to the example of an individual’s journey of transformation and deeper awareness, it does not appear that the consciousness of these two businesses has yet translated into the same level of whole system thinking. Their conscious awareness has not led to greater responsibility. When it does, I would expect to see sourcing strategies, merchandising decisions, packaging materials, marketing campaigns and other decisions approached from a higher awareness and collective perspective. Walking into these stores you will immediately know that they are not in business as usual – their “inner” growth will be obvious in their outer appearance and actions.

Social enterprises, on the other hand, are using business to make a difference – solving big problems and impacting people’s lives. Yet they tend to do that with traditional business tools, management practices and organizational structures. Operating with greater responsibility, these social enterprises often are not functioning with deeper awareness. Their right and sustainable actions are not supported by conscious business practices.

We need both – more aware AND responsible businesses. Sustainability is not simply a green movement of incremental actions alone; we also need radical new thinking and changes in business that accelerates progress to a sustainable future – what I call blue thinking. These conscious businesses have greater awareness and deploy systems-level, whole-perspective thinking to consider the full impact and all consequences of its actions. They relate more consciously through new organizational structures and manage with deeper awareness through innovative management tools that integrate meaning-making and money-making so that mission is top of mind and integral to the organization’s strategy. This shift to more aware AND responsible conscious businesses would make doing good (impact) as important as doing well (profit), all while solving some of our biggest challenges, creating jobs and enabling a sustainable future.